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biomedicalephemera:

Top: Rodent ulcer of twelve years duration (spontaneous cicatrization [sealing off; stopping spreading])

Bottom: Rodent ulcer of sixteen years duration (Terebant [Piercing] type)

Rodent ulcers” (also known as Jacobi ulcers) are so named due to their rat-gnawed appearance.
They are a manifestation of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC), and while they’re rarely fatal, they have the potential to be extremely disfiguring. Unlike most BCCs, rodent ulcers have significant central necrotization, leading to more tissue damage.

While the extreme destruction seen on these two patients is no longer commonplace in the developed world, treatment and removal of these ulcers can be very expensive, and they often recur, even with treatment. As they don’t often kill and often strike the very elderly, with removal frequently being more painful than the ulcer itself, basal-cell carcinoma is of the few cancers that is often simply monitored, rather than aggressively treated.

In Caucasian people, up to 30% of adults will develop some form of this cancer in their lifetimes. The most common cause is significant unprotected sun exposure, but genetics also plays a role in susceptibility. Thankfully, rodent ulcers are one of the less-common presentations.

Diseases of the Skin. James H. Sequeira, 1919.

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to visit Hiroshima and the Memorial Museum which stands there.

I have to say that it was a really somber experience. We have all seen the photos online and in textbooks, but to actually see the photo and be able to read how that person photographed spent their finals moments in grave detail is really a different experience. To touch a real “shadow person” and see actual pieces of the victims on display was really depressing. The photo above is pieces of a junior high school student on display at the museum with the story below:

"Noriaki Teshima, a first-year student at Second Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School, was exposed while engaged in building demolition. Burned so severely that skin hung loose from his whole body, he was rescued and taken home by a friend. Unable to bear his thirst, he reportedly sucked the pus from the ends of his fingers, from which the nails had peeled off. He died in agony on the next day, August 7. His mother kept his fingernails and some of his skin as a remembrance to show his father, who had been sent off to war."

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to visit Hiroshima and the Memorial Museum which stands there.

I have to say that it was a really somber experience. We have all seen the photos online and in textbooks, but to actually see the photo and be able to read how that person photographed spent their finals moments in grave detail is really a different experience. To touch a real “shadow person” and see actual pieces of the victims on display was really depressing. The photo above is pieces of a junior high school student on display at the museum with the story below:

"Noriaki Teshima, a first-year student at Second Hiroshima Prefectural Junior High School, was exposed while engaged in building demolition. Burned so severely that skin hung loose from his whole body, he was rescued and taken home by a friend. Unable to bear his thirst, he reportedly sucked the pus from the ends of his fingers, from which the nails had peeled off. He died in agony on the next day, August 7. His mother kept his fingernails and some of his skin as a remembrance to show his father, who had been sent off to war."

dance-0f-the-damned said: Really enjoy reading your blog! It's fascinating (:

Thank you kindly, I’m happy to hear so! :)

malformalady:

One man’s love of sashimi nearly killed him after it led to his body becoming riddled with tapeworm. The Chinese man had seen his doctor complaining of stomach ache and itchy skin. Scans revealed his entire body had been infected with tapeworm parasites after eating too much sashimi - raw slices of fish. Doctors believe some of the uncooked Japanese delicacy of raw meat or fish must have become contaminated. He was treated at the Guangzhou No. 8 People’s Hospital in Guangdong Province, in eastern China.

malformalady:

One man’s love of sashimi nearly killed him after it led to his body becoming riddled with tapeworm. The Chinese man had seen his doctor complaining of stomach ache and itchy skin. Scans revealed his entire body had been infected with tapeworm parasites after eating too much sashimi - raw slices of fish. Doctors believe some of the uncooked Japanese delicacy of raw meat or fish must have become contaminated. He was treated at the Guangzhou No. 8 People’s Hospital in Guangdong Province, in eastern China.

Well hello,

So if would seem that I acquired a whole new following while I was on my honeymoon, hello and thank you!

I just got in last night and jet lag will be the death of me, but I hope to start posting again within the next few days - week range.

Thank you to the new and old.

zackyvengeancesnipples said: I'm really interested in embalming but I am not very good at biology or chemistry so do have any advice or tips?

As I’ve said before, I’m not in school for it as of yet, I just work in a funeral home. :) I’m actually quite terrible at chemistry myself (luckily its not the only aspect to embalming), but my in laws bought me all of the embalming course books as a birthday gift one year (you can get the main one for about $100) so in my spare time I just read and make notes for myself. I’m lucky with my position because if I have any questions I just ask one of the embalmers that I work with. My advice would to be find your study style and go with it, it’s just like any job, you’ll be better at some parts of it than others. Universities (at least where I live) will also offer “open door” nights where they explain the funeral business, what a day to day is like, and open floor questions (usually with an embalmer, a funeral director, and a current student). Universities here will also offer a “2 day introduction course” where they will take you through a funeral home and show you videos and explains the process in lieu of having work experience. Although I think working in a funeral home prior is really beneficial just because you can get a feel for the business, how it works, and if it’s a good fit (It happens). Sorry that I couldn’t be more helpful!

Carrie

Anonymous said: Hi! I noticed on your other blog that you are a funeral director? Do you have a mortuary science degree? And do you embalm? I started with radiology and just recently realized I'd much rather embalm or autopsy. How did you get into that profession? There is only one school in my state that offers mortuary degrees and it's very far away. I heard you could possibly intern in some states? I think I also saw where you weren't in USA.

Ask away! :)

I’m not a licensed funeral director yet. I work at a small family owned funeral home (literally 3 funeral directors/embalmers and myself), so right now I do basically everything except for the embalming/cremation. I’ve wanted to get my embalming license for a few years now so I just sort of watched job ads for funeral homes online and applied yo see if I actually liked the industry first before spending the money on school (I hope to apply in the next fall intake). so far I love it, everyday is interesting and genuinely rewarding.

I live in Canada so I assume regulations are different here than in the US. Here you have to go to university for one year, internship for the second year, then write a provincial exam to get licensed. I think that if you have an interest you should pursue it. As my boss told me when he first met me: “People don’t choose this industry, this industry chooses them.”

Sorry for the long winded answer!

kissesforyourlovin said: Congratulations!!!

Thank you!

A slight hiatus;

As I am getting married in a week and then in Japan until the 17th, I am putting this blog on a temporary hiatus.

I’ll still probably be checking my messages and such so you can reach me, but I won’t be “active” until I return.

♡,
Carrie