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Anonymous said: Hi! I noticed on your other blog that you are a funeral director? Do you have a mortuary science degree? And do you embalm? I started with radiology and just recently realized I'd much rather embalm or autopsy. How did you get into that profession? There is only one school in my state that offers mortuary degrees and it's very far away. I heard you could possibly intern in some states? I think I also saw where you weren't in USA.

Ask away! :)

I’m not a licensed funeral director yet. I work at a small family owned funeral home (literally 3 funeral directors/embalmers and myself), so right now I do basically everything except for the embalming/cremation. I’ve wanted to get my embalming license for a few years now so I just sort of watched job ads for funeral homes online and applied yo see if I actually liked the industry first before spending the money on school (I hope to apply in the next fall intake). so far I love it, everyday is interesting and genuinely rewarding.

I live in Canada so I assume regulations are different here than in the US. Here you have to go to university for one year, internship for the second year, then write a provincial exam to get licensed. I think that if you have an interest you should pursue it. As my boss told me when he first met me: “People don’t choose this industry, this industry chooses them.”

Sorry for the long winded answer!

kissesforyourlovin said: Congratulations!!!

Thank you!

A slight hiatus;

As I am getting married in a week and then in Japan until the 17th, I am putting this blog on a temporary hiatus.

I’ll still probably be checking my messages and such so you can reach me, but I won’t be “active” until I return.

♡,
Carrie

Today at work I encountered my first mummification case, much like (but obviously not the same person)  photographed above. I’m still trying to get used to the smell of things, but it was definitely an interesting lesson. 


“Mummification is a modification of putrefaction characterised by the dehydration or dessication of the tissues. The body shrivels and is converted into a leathery or parchment-like mass of skin and tendons surrounding the bone. The internal organs are often decomposed but may be preserved. Skin shrinkage may produce large artefactual splits mimmicking injuries. These are particularly seen in the groins, around the neck, and the armpits.”

Today at work I encountered my first mummification case, much like (but obviously not the same person) photographed above. I’m still trying to get used to the smell of things, but it was definitely an interesting lesson.


“Mummification is a modification of putrefaction characterised by the dehydration or dessication of the tissues. The body shrivels and is converted into a leathery or parchment-like mass of skin and tendons surrounding the bone. The internal organs are often decomposed but may be preserved. Skin shrinkage may produce large artefactual splits mimmicking injuries. These are particularly seen in the groins, around the neck, and the armpits.”

dimens1ons:

Injured mother and son after receiving rice balls from emergency aid for Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1945.

dimens1ons:

Injured mother and son after receiving rice balls from emergency aid for Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, 1945.

biomedicalephemera:

Clinical shot of patient recovering from gas gangrene
Gas gangrene is usually caused by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens, but can be caused by any other anaerobic bacteria that infects muscle tissue. It’s often fatal, as the infection and exotoxins from the bacteria quickly flood the bloodstream, in addition to breaking down the muscular tissue.
If amputation was not an option, debridement (the medical removal of dead or infected tissue) and excision was often the only treatment. Secondary infection after removal of the infected tissue was a common problem, but antibiotic use after treatment helped stave off new bacteria.
Image from Otis Archives

biomedicalephemera:

Clinical shot of patient recovering from gas gangrene

Gas gangrene is usually caused by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens, but can be caused by any other anaerobic bacteria that infects muscle tissue. It’s often fatal, as the infection and exotoxins from the bacteria quickly flood the bloodstream, in addition to breaking down the muscular tissue.

If amputation was not an option, debridement (the medical removal of dead or infected tissue) and excision was often the only treatment. Secondary infection after removal of the infected tissue was a common problem, but antibiotic use after treatment helped stave off new bacteria.

Image from Otis Archives

On another note,

I just started my very first ”Personal Blog” if any of you care enough to follow. Quite a different direction from this blog, but hey, it floats my boat.

http://carriiebou.tumblr.com/

sedgewina:

Many soldiers came back from the trenches of WWI missing bits of their face. But 1920s society wasn’t the nicest place to look like a gnarled piece of meat, and facial surgery was barely beyond grafting your finger to your nose.

The answer: masks! Sculptors such as Anna Coleman Ladd and Francis Derwent Wood would make new bits of face from copper for these gentlemen, either from life-casts or from photographs. 

The masks were either held in place by string or attached to glasses, and were painted to match the wearer’s skin colour. Things like facial hair and artificial eyes were also added where needed.

Further info

Not really medical, but still vintage -

Photograph of my grandfather holding an owl that froze to death with wings spread. Circa 1950’s~, Hanley, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Not really medical, but still vintage -

Photograph of my grandfather holding an owl that froze to death with wings spread. Circa 1950’s~, Hanley, Saskatchewan, Canada.

malformalady:

Bound feet “Sing-Song” girls in training at a tea-house, China, 1930’s by Ellen Thorbecke

malformalady:

Bound feet “Sing-Song” girls in training at a tea-house, China, 1930’s by Ellen Thorbecke